A traffic vision for 10 years’ time

Friday, 14th January

• THERE is an unintended irony in your ECO2022 article by John Chamberlain, (A future where you can cycle anywhere, January 6).

Perhaps he hasn’t noticed – they already do – on pavements, through red lights, on footpaths, the wrong way down no-entry streets, freedom to ride without lights after dark. Noiseless scooters are even worse and more dangerous.

My vision for 10 years’ time is:

– Every cyclist found riding on the pavement is immediately stopped and fined, on the spot, to give them a law-breaking record, which they are doing regardless.

Similarly with illegal or e-scooters riding silently along the pavements.

– Also that every cyclist should be compelled to have a registration plate on the bike, as do some (legal)
e-scooters.

Furthermore, delivery firms that exploit cycle and motorcycle riders to make deliveries should also be prosecuted over the appalling failure to monitor their gig employees over the total lack of road sense, dangerous, idiotic, and inconsiderate riding, again, frequently on pavements, over pedestrian precincts and crossings, through red lights, etc.

Having complained in writing to one firm I received an unbelievable, fairytale, response telling me that all their riders are checked for their law-abiding credentials!

Their managers need to get out more and see for themselves the bloody awful behaviour of their riders.

I am well aware the cause is the payment by delivery, not by the hour. And that is iniquitous and should be changed to avoid the constant need for dangerous speed there and back.

In 10 years’ time, Cllr Adam Harrison (or his replacement) will (pious hope) see sense and only provide cycle lanes where there is sufficient road space; for example, down Haverstock Hill to Chalk Farm there is barely room for buses to pass and the cycle lane itself is hardly used.

Now he proposes to remove all parking and implement another cycle lane further up the hill.

Despite John Chamberlain’s wishful thinking nothing is going to stop the Chelsea tractor brigade from ferrying their little darlings to and from school; nor is he going to be able to stop all the numerous food delivery vans since working from home started.

Some people need cars for carrying goods, awkward cross-country journeys where no suitable public transport is available, elderly transport to and from hospital, etc.

To think otherwise is totally unrealistic.

JOHN STRATTON
Thurlow Road, NW3

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