Fox hunt saboteurs find posters ripped up

'Some people say hunting is a political issue, but I personally cannot see anything political about torturing to death a fox with a pitch fork'

Thursday, 14th July — By Dan Carrier

rhys giles fox hunting

Rhys Giles says people misunderstand what ‘sabs’ do

SUPPORTERS of fox-hunting have been sneaking around the streets of Primrose Hill in an attempt to wreck a fundraiser for an animal rights group.
Posters for a vegan dinner at Manna had been up on community noticeboards and on trees around Primrose Hill.

The event in August aims to raise money for the North London Hunt Saboteurs.

But persons unknown have targeted the group, destroying all but one poster overnight.

Organiser Rhys Giles, who lives in Primrose Hill and has been involved with the group for many years, said: “I put them up on Monday along Chalcot Road and Chalcot Square. They were on lamp posts, trees and notice­boards. Primrose Hill is an area where there are always a lot of community events advertised – things at the community association, the library, and other events.

“There are lots of posters up. They all remained untouched – it was only ours that were ripped down.”

Mr Giles added: “I find it strange – though sometimes people misunderstand what hunt sabs do. In terms of animal rights, and if you care about animals, this is the most direct action you can take.
“We are physically going out and protecting wildlife while upholding the law. It is morally justified on every level.”

While some anti-hunting groups seek to uphold legislation which banned fox hunting two decades ago by acting as monitors watching hunts, the North London Hunt Saboteur group have an array of tricks to help foxes escape violent deaths. Their work can help police charge those breaking the law.

Mr Giles said: “Some people say hunting is a political issue, but I personally cannot see anything political about torturing to death a fox with a pitch fork.”

Other ways to help foxes and other wildlife escape hunting packs include spraying heavily scented citronella on trails to confuse the hounds, talking to hunters about the evidence of the distress they are causing, and standing between the hunters and their quarry.

He added: “Primrose Hill has always struck me as a place full of animal lovers. You only have to see the percentage who own dogs. It makes it hard to understand why, even if you agree with killing animals, you were scared of any debate.”

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